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WHY

PERSONALISED MARKETING MATTERS?

WHY USE A

PROFESSIONAL MAIL HOUSE?

Personalisation is no longer the new kid on the marketing block. Today we recieve customised direct mail, emails, even video, often without realising the content has been specifically chosen to suit our demographic or previous brand interaction.

So why the push to greater personalise our marketing communication?

Here are a few reasons you’ll already know, and a few you many not, as to why personalisation helps our messages hit the spot.

BUILDS LOYALTY

People tend to choose businesses who remember them and demonstrate some familiarity in their interaction (too much is creepy, so beware of crossing the line). Using a name or other unique feature about a customer will make them feel important, special and validated, making them more likely to return.

CREATES LIKEABILITY

Just like face to face conversations, if someone remembers and uses your name, you tend to like them that little bit more. Personalisation is interpreted as being caring and empathetic, and creates a stronger bond with your brand, product or service.

ADDS A WOW FACTOR

Using your name on a letter or email might not raise an eyebrow, but surely you love those personalised videos that pop up on Facebook from time to time? Facebook takes your data, adds in a photo or two from your feed, and presto, you have a commemorative video of the last five years. Definitely a bigger WOW factor, but still personalisation all the same.
 

TWO WAY DIALOGUE

Direct mail is undoubtedly a harder channel to track and measure, so building rapport with your customer is an important start to a two way conversation. Using your customer’s name (especially in imagery) will get their full ‘listening’ attention. Let them ‘speak’ by integrating a personalised landing page as part of your Call To Action. 

 

TALK TO US ABOUT PERSONALISATION

PRINTCRAFT PERSONALISATION
PUTS US IN CONTROL

According to a study from the University of Texas, our preference for personalised experiences comes down to two key factors – a desire for control and information overload. It seems that when we receive something unique and tailored to us, it makes us feel more in control, and being more in control makes us physiologically more healthy and more successful. *

ENGAGEMENT

I recently attended a seminar where I learned ‘engagement’ was one of today’s most overused words in copywriting. Cringe, and here it is again. We engage with what we like, find interesting, haven’t seen before, find relevant, funny or even plain stupid. If you don’t have a million bucks in your budget or the next big creative idea, maybe you could use personalisation to stir up one of these emotions.

HOW WE MANAGE PERSONALISATION

While I appreciate there are bots that can track and remarket personalised content from your every digital move, the Printcraft solution is a data driven one through a software platform we call PIVOT.

Similar to a mail merge, you nominate a data field in the artwork as the variable content source. For variable images, the file name must match the data field – for example johnsmithphoto.jpg must be an exact match to the data for the program to select the image and place it within the artwork.

For more information on setting up your files for personalisation contact us below, or check out our Preparing for Personalisation Fact Sheet.

TALK TO US ABOUT PERSONALISATION

WHY WE LOVE OUR NAMES

 

Our name is our tag. It’s what others use to get our attention, reprimand and love us, address and reason with us. When we hear our name we instinctively turn to the speaker, only to become confused when it’s not us they’re referring to, but someone else with, gulp … our name. As Dale Carnegie once said a person’s name to them, is the sweetest, most important sound in any language.  It’s no wonder we’re so attached to them.

It seems now we also ‘look’ like our names. According to the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, computers today have algorithms to match faces and names with more than just random accuracy. *

Yonat Zwebner from The Hebrew University believes the results of the experiment may suggest people subconsciously alter their appearance to conform to cultural norms and cues associated with their names. For instance people are more likely to image a person named Bob with a rounder face than a person named Tim, but that’s really a whole other blog post **